Services

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Services Offered

Home Inspection

home inspection is a limited, non-invasive examination of the condition of a home, often in connection with the sale of that home. The inspector prepares and delivers to the client a written report of the findings .The client then uses the knowledge gained to make informed decisions about their pending real estate purchase. The home inspector describes the condition of the home at the time of inspection but does not guarantee future condition, efficiency, or life expectancy of systems or components.

View a sample Home Inspection Report, here:

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Commercial Inspection

Just as a land developer may hire a general contractor to oversee a variety of subcontractors who actually perform the construction work, a commercial investor often hires an inspector whose responsibilities typically involve overseeing a variety of subcontractors. These subcontractors provide specialty inspection reports on building systems, such as HVAC, electrical, roofing, structure, and whatever else is called for in the Client/Inspector Contract.  Although the Standards are available and extremely useful, the goal of a commercial inspection is to provide the client with the information they need to enter into transaction negotiations with as much power in their possession as possible.

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Mobile Home Inspection

A manufactured home inspection is a complete inspection of the home, from the roof to the ground. There are specific areas that are thoroughly inspected such as roofs, plumbing, electricity, heating and cooling, and flooring.  A competent, licensed inspector for manufactured homes understands the unique issues of factory-built homes. This knowledge allows them to pinpoint current and future issues that may be unsafe, lower the value of the home, or be too expensive to repair.

In the InterNACHI forum, a manufactured home inspector shared a list of the ten most important things in a manufactured home inspection:

1. Check the marriage line inside the home for alignment with the other half.
2. Check the pier spacing, condition, over extended jack heads, and wood pads with large cracks.
3. Check that utilities are supported and not resting on the ground.
4. Check that the moisture barrier is properly installed and is without any tears or sections missing.
5. Check for soft spots on particle board flooring throughout the home.
6. Check the water heater and the furnace area’s flooring as they get damaged easily.
7. Check for Modulux ceiling panels that are sagging (caused by broken 1″ x 2″ or 2″ x 2″ rafter).
8. Check to see if the roof structure is sagging.
9. Some homes have 4’ to 5’ outriggers causing outside edges to sag from the weight. Check for crowning.
10. Check for toilets that are loose at the plastic flange.
11. Squeaky floors caused by loose sub flooring, loose pier, or a loose lag at a joist frame connection.
12. Check for damaged or missing molding throughout home.

New Construction Inspection

“New” doesn’t mean “perfect.”  Just because a home is new does not mean there are no flaws.  Code inspectors don’t inspect cosmetic or functional issues such as leaky faucets, windows, doors and kitchen cabinets.  It is common to find many flaws in a new home that can be corrected before you make your purchase.

Pre-Listing Inspection

Eventually, your buyers are going to conduct an inspection. You may as well know what they are going to find by getting there first.  Having an inspection performed ahead of time helps in many other ways, such as:

 

  • It allows you to see your home through the eyes of a critical and neutral third party.
  • It alerts you to immediate safety issues before agents and visitors tour your home.
  • It may alert you to items of immediate concern, such as radon gas or active termite infestation.
  • Defects won’t become negotiating stumbling blocks later.
  • There is no delay in obtaining the Use and Occupancy Permit.
  • You have the time to get reasonably priced contractors or make the repairs yourself, if qualified.
  • It helps you to price your home realistically.
  • It may relieve prospects’ concerns and suspicions.
  • It may encourage the buyer to waive his inspection contingency.
  • It reduces your liability by adding professional supporting documentation to your disclosure statement.

Ancillary Services Offered

Home Energy Scoring

Developed by Department of Energy and its national laboratories, the Home Energy Score provides home owners, buyers, and renters directly comparable and credible information about a home’s energy use. Like a miles-per-gallon rating for a car, the Home Energy Score is based on a standard assessment of energy-related assets to easily compare energy use across the housing market.  The Home Energy Score Report estimates home energy use, associated costs, and provides energy solutions to cost-effectively improve the home’s efficiency.

View a sample Home Energy Report, here:

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Lead Testing

Radon Testing

Septic Testing

Payment for all services is required at the time of inspection.